Frequently Asked Questions

  • Review of Pike Management
  • General
  • Angling
  • Salmon Conservation Fund
  • NSAD
  • Stock Management
  • Policies

Review of Pike Management in Designated Wild Brown Trout Fisheries

This FAQ is in respect of the public consultation on the Review of Pike Management in Designated Wild Brown Trout Fisheries scheduled for 2016/2017

  • When is the Group going to start its review? +

    The Review Group will meet in early November and will invite Angling Representatives to meet with them towards the end of November.

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  • Who is on the Pike and Wild Brown Trout Policy Review Group from Inland Fisheries Ireland? +

    The Pike and Wild Brown Trout Policy Review Group comprises of a range of representatives from all disciplines within Inland Fisheries Ireland.

    • Mr Sean Long –Director, South Western River Basin District (Chairman)
    • Dr Sam Sheppard – Population Modeller, Inland Fisheries Ireland Research & Development
    • Mr Declan Cooke – Inspector, Western River Basin District
    • Ms Josie Mahon – Inspector, Eastern River Basin District
    • Mr Paul O’ Reilly – Economic Research & Angling Advisor, Business Development Division 
    • Mr Myles Kelly – Secretariat to Group, Inland Fisheries Ireland
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  • What will this new review consider? +

    Please see the ‘Terms of Reference:  Terms of Reference

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  • What is the difference between the initial review group’s terms of reference and the new one? +

    Inland Fisheries Ireland initially planned to review the general policies for Pike and Wild Brown Trout in tandem; the revised terms of reference require the review group to only consider the management of pike in designated wild brown trout fisheries.

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  • What were the original Terms of Reference for the Pike & Wild Brown Trout Policy Review Group? +

  • Why has Inland Fisheries Ireland changed the Terms of Reference? +

    Inland Fisheries Ireland recognised the concerns of some stakeholders in relation to the pike and wild brown trout policies and the interrelationship between pike and wild brown trout. As there are many more issues than just the areas where they overlap, it was decided to separate the policy reviews and initially focus on the management of pike in designated wild brown trout fisheries. The other policy reviews will be dealt will subsequently.

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  • This Policy Review was due to start in July 2016. Why has there been a delay? +

    In 2014, Inland Fisheries Ireland developed policies on the management of Wild Brown Trout, Pike and Bass. These policies were scheduled to be reviewed in 2017, however recognising the concerns of some stakeholders in relation to the pike and wild brown trout policies, the Board of Inland Fisheries Ireland decided to bring forward the review period for the pike and wild brown trout policies and commence the process in 2016. 

    Given the interrelationship between pike and wild brown trout and the experiences from the initial policy development groups, it was decided to combine the review group and consider both policies in tandem and Terms of Reference were developed in July 2016 to this effect. However, on review, the Board of Inland Fisheries Ireland determined that rather than review the policies in tandem, it would be more effective to review the element of greatest debate first, that is the management of pike in designated wild brown trout fisheries. As a result, revised Terms of Reference were drawn up and a new Public Consultation Process launched.

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  • How do I make a submission to this consultation and how long have I got? +

    All submissions must be made in writing and will be published on the Inland Fisheries Ireland website www.fisheriesireland.ie .

    Submissions should be marked ‘Public consultation – Pike Management in Brown Trout Fisheries’ and be submitted by email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or by post to:

    Policy Review

    Inland Fisheries Ireland

    Sunnyside House

    Macroom

    Co. Cork

     

    The Public Consultation period will run for four weeks and the closing date for receipt of submissions is 5pm on Thursday, 1st of December 2016.

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  • What is Inland Fisheries Ireland’s current policy regarding the management of pike in wild brown trout fisheries? +

    Currently stock management is undertaken on certain waters for the conservation of wild brown trout waters which are managed by Inland Fisheries Ireland as wild brown trout fisheries. Such waters are identified in Inland Fisheries Ireland’s pike and trout management policies. Further information on current policies and procedures is available here: http://www.fisheriesireland.ie/FAQ/faq.html

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  • What is this policy review and public consultation all about? +

    Inland Fisheries Ireland has launched a public consultation on the management of pike in designated wild brown trout fisheries. The Board of Inland Fisheries Ireland has decided to commence a review period of its policies on the management of Wild Brown Trout, Pike and Bass which were initially developed in 2014. A consultation process will now commence and will focus initially on pike management.

    Inland Fisheries Ireland recognises the diverse opinions of stakeholders regarding the management of pike in wild brown trout fisheries and welcomes the opportunity to engage on this issue. All interested parties are invited to make submissions which will be comprehensively reviewed and considered by the newly appointed Pike and Wild Brown Trout Policy Review Group. This group comprises of a range of representatives from all disciplines within Inland Fisheries Ireland.

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  • How will submissions be weighted? +

    Q: Is there equal weighting given to each submission irrespective of whether the submission represents the views of 1 individual or a large number of individuals (e.g. A submission made on behalf of members of a federation or club) 

    A: All submissions will be carefully considered as part of the overall submissions received during the public consultation process, regardless of how many times the same point or issue is addressed. The Group will not reach any conclusions based on the number of submissions made on any particular issue. The public consultation process is intended to capture the breadth of public discourse.

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  • Can individuals reference an online document or statement to represent their views +

    Q: Can individuals reference an online document or statement to represent their views

    A: Individuals can attach reference documentation to their submissions and may also suggest reference material for the consideration of the Group 

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  • Can documents be added to a submission after closing date? +

    Q: Can documentation referenced in a submission be provided at a later date but no later than 15th December 2016 (2 weeks after submission closing date). Can you confirm that such documentation submitted at this time but previously referenced in a submission submitted on or prior to 1st December 2016 will be fully included and considered in the review process.

    A: In order for the review Group to carry out its work in an efficient manner, submissions must be made on or prior to the 5th December 2016. However, the substantive work of the Group will continue after that date and documentation in support of a submission made on or prior to the 5th December 2016 will be considered. 

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  • Will this result in a second pike policy? +

    Q: Will there now be two Pike Policies relating to Irish pike given that the policy review relating to pike has been separated (by IFI) into two instances.

    A: The Group is reviewing the specific issue of pike management in designated wild brown trout fisheries; the impact, if any, of its recommendations on existing policies cannot be determined at this point. 

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  • Information on the Lough Derg Survey +

    Information on the Lough Derg Survey

    Why Survey Lough Derg ?

    IFI is aware of major changes in the ecology of many of our freshwaters over the last four decades due to the spread of non-native species, the spread of invasive species and various anthropogenic pressures.  As the statutory body charged with the conservation of our waterways IFI need to stay informed on the status of fish stocks in all Irelands’ major fisheries, including Lough Derg.  It is also a requirement of the Water Framework Directive (WFD) surveillance monitoring programme that the fish stocks in Lough Derg are monitored every three years.  A fish stock survey, using survey gill nets and other methods (e.g. fyke nets, hydroacoustics) is standard international practice for carrying out such a census.  Lough Derg was surveyed previously as part of IFIs WFD monitoring programme in 2012 and 2009. 

    Survey Timing

    The summer season is the most appropriate season for undertaking a full fish stock survey on a lake, as most fish species are active at this time and spawning of coarse fish species is normally finished, juvenile fish are also large enough to be captured.  Since 2005 fish surveys for Water Framework Directive Monitoring purposes have been undertaken during the June to early October period..

    Are new / alternative fishing methods being explored?

    IFI continue to explore new fishing methods that will enable us to quantify the stock levels in our fisheries.  A specialised boat fitted with hydroacoustic apparatus will be surveying the deep parts of the lake in tandem with the netting survey.  This method may, in time, offer an alternative method to survey gill nets but it will require a considerable amount of research and ground truthing, the latter which will be achieved using survey gill nets.
    IFI is also bringing into operation electrofishing boom boats, which have the capability of catching fish in water up to 2 metres deep (and deeper in clear lake situations).  This method will complement other lake fishing methods but on its own will not be capable of generating the metrics required to assess the stock status of a large lake system.  One of these boats will be used in selected shallow areas of Lough Derg during the survey.

    Survey Catches relative to Stocks

    It must be stressed that this netting exercise is a survey of all fish stock species, not a management tool in relation to pike or any other species.  IFI are aware that Lough Derg is a valuable “mixed fishery” for Cyprinids, Pike and Trout.  Data indicates that the proportion of any species captured in such a survey is usually ≤ 0.1% of the stock of any species present.

    Survey gill nets in tandem with fyke nets provide the most effective method for catching fishes in lakes.  The nets are generally set for a period not exceeding 24 hours but commonly are fished overnight to capture the active periods of fish movement, i.e. dawn and dusk.  Not all fish that enter survey gill nets are killed and many can be removed and returned alive to the water.  Research conducted within IFI over the years, commonly using tagging methods, has demonstrated that many fish that are released from survey gill nets survive for long periods and are available to the angler.

    Some fish species (e.g. bream and large hybrids) can be relatively unaffected by survey gill nets as they become passive once they enter the net.  The proportion of fish captured in survey gill netting operations relative to the stock levels present in a lake is very small (usually ≤ 0.1% of the stock of any species present).  Every effort is made by IFI staff to release live fish to the water.

    What happens to the fish that are killed?

    All fish that fail to survive the survey gill netting operation will be used for scientific purposes.  Each fish will be measured, weighed, aged and have their stomach contents examined.  This information will be analysed to provide information on the age cohorts of each fish species present, their relative growth rates, their feeding patterns and other relevant information.

    Fish scales will also be retained for possible subsequent genetic or other use.

    Other studies being undertaken in parallel

    Pike diet

    As part of the on-going review of the pike policy a new research project has been initiated by IFI to assess the seasonal diet of pike in selected Irish waters.  A trial of appropriate methods to use in this new research project is being undertaken on Lough Derg in tandem with the fish stock survey.

    Landlocked sea lamprey

    IFI are collecting information on landlocked sea lamprey as part of the ongoing research on rare and endangered fish species.  IFI staff will be recording information on fish with lesions and other relevant information.

    Eels

    Many eels have been tagged in the Shannon catchment as part of the National Eel Management Programme.  During the fish stock survey the IFI survey team will be checking eels captured in fyke nets for tags and recording the relevant information.

     

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  • How can I find out who own certain fishing rights? +

    Researching the ownership of fishing rights requires careful examination of various documents. The methodology is explained in detail below.

    When researching the ownership of fishing rights to a lake or river and even when a portion of a river is downstream of the high water mark (shown on Ordinance Survey maps, with the letters, HWM), it is best to begin in the Land Registry.  You can search and view maps and folios on-line as a non-account holder here. You’ll need to pay a fee for each folio you choose to view.

    Search for the property and establish whether the land is registered or unregistered.  If registered check if the river or lake is part of the registered area.  If so, the bed and soil is owned by the adjoining landowner.  Find the relevant folio and examine it to see how fishing rights were dealt with.

    On folios drafted for land purchases under the 1903 Land Act, it may state that the sporting rights, (which under the Act included fishing rights), are:

    • Retained by the vendor/landlord
    • In the ownership of another party
    • Retained by the vendor for his/her lifetime
    • Held concurrently between vendor and purchaser.

    If there is no mention of fishing or sporting rights, it is most likely that they were transferred with the land to the purchaser.

    If there is no mention of fishing or sporting rights on the land registry folio you should also contact the Records Branch Land Commission in the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (at the address below) to see if they have any record of a fee farm grant* or other types of conveyance associated with the property. The records Branch are the keepers of all the old Irish Land Commission files.

    Records Branch,
    Unit 11,
    Clonminam Industrial Estate,
    Portlaoise.
    Tel: 057 8634988 
    Fax: 057 8670959

    *In English and Irish law, a Fee farm grant is a hybrid type of land ownership typical in cities and towns. The word "fee" is derived from fief, meaning a feudal landholding, and a fee farm grant is similar to a fee simple in the sense that it gives the grantee the right to hold a freehold estate, the only difference being the payment of an annual rent (farm being an archaic word for rent) and covenants, thus putting both parties in a landlord-tenant relationship.

    In folios drafted for purchases under the 1923, 1929 and subsequent Acts, check for burdens specifically relating to fishing rights, which are dealt with separately from the sporting rights.  These will be found in Part Three of the folio.  They will state as follows:

    • The fishing rights and fisheries (if any), are reserved to the Land Commission.  In this case, the fishing rights were retained by the Land Commission and were subsequently transferred to the Central Fisheries Board, by virtue of the Land Commission Dissolution Act 1992. In 2010 the Central and Regional Fisheries Boards were amalgamated into a new single agency, Inland Fisheries Ireland, and so these fishing rights now belong to Inland Fisheries Ireland.
    • The fishing rights and fisheries (if any), are excepted by order of the Land Commission or by fiat of the Land Commission<.   In this instance the ownership of the fishing rights had not been adjudicated on when the vesting of the land in the purchaser was completed.  The Land Commission were required to make an order under Section 4 of the 1929 Act, stating whether the fishing rights vested or did not vest in the Land Commission. Where they made the Order, stating they did not vest in the Land Commission, they remained in the ownership of the vendor.  They never vested in the purchaser.
    • The fishing rights under Section 23 of the 1929 Act are subject to Section 3 of the 1929 Act.nbsp; This means where the process of vesting has commenced under the 1923 Act.

    The Land Commission only completed Orders under Section 4 of the 1929 Act in under 5% of cases.  The reasons for this are, some of these fisheries were not considered valuable when the lands were being dealt with, the landlord/vendor did not lodge the requisite Form 27 claiming the ownership.  These fisheries are considered to be in “limbo. However, since the vendor did not claim ownership of them, it is possible that the law, under the 1923 Act, still applies, in that the fisheries are vested in the Land Commission.

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  • What are the right of Fishery Officers to enter and cross lands? +

    The right of Fishery Officers to enter and cross lands are primarily addressed in the 1959 Fisheries Consolidation Acts as amended.

    The key sections – there are some others but these are the main ones are as follows:

    1. Powers of Authorised person:

    296.—(1) Any authorised person may, for the purposes of the protection of the fisheries, do all or any of the following things:—

     
       

    (a) enter into and pass through or along the banks or borders of any lakes or rivers frequented by salmon or trout or of the tributaries thereof,

       

    (b) with boats or otherwise enter upon any such lakes or rivers,

       

    (c) enter upon and examine all weirs, sluices, mill dams, mill races and watercourses communicating with such lakes or rivers,

       

    (d) enter any boat engaged or about to engage in fishing,

       

    (e) examine all standing, floating or other nets whatsoever,

       

    (f) seize any unlawful fishing engine or any lawful fishing engine which is being unlawfully used,

       

    (g) do all such other acts and things as he is authorised to do by or under this Act.

    (2)   Nothing in this section shall be construed as authorising any authorised person to enter any enclosed garden or any dwelling house or the curtilage thereof except where the ordinary road or passage to any weir, dam or dyke is through such garden or curtilage.

         

    And also under Authorised Officer powers:

    301.—(1) In this section the expression “authorised officer” means any person being—

     
       

    (a) a member of the Garda Síochána, or

       

    (b) an officer or servant of a board of conservators authorised in writing by that board to exercise the powers conferred by this section, or

       

    (c) an officer of the Minister, authorised in writing by the Minister to exercise the powers conferred by this section, or

       

    (d) an officer or servant of the Electricity Supply Board authorised in writing by the Minister to exercise the powers conferred by this section.

       

    (2) Every authorised officer is hereby authorised to do all or any of the following things:—

       

    (a) to stop and search any person conveying or suspected to be conveying fish of any kind or any instrument or substance used or adapted for taking fish unlawfully and to inspect any fish, instrument or substance which such person is found to be conveying and for that purpose to open and search any vehicle or package in which such fish, instrument or substance is or may be or is believed to be conveyed;

       

    (b) at all reasonable times to enter upon and have free access to the interior of—

       

    (i) any premises in which fish is or is believed to be sold, or kept, exposed or stored for sale, or

       

    (ii) any premises in which poison or explosive intended for the destruction of fish is or is believed to be kept, or

       

    (iii) the premises of any person engaged in the business of carrying goods for reward, or

       

    (iv) any aerodrome, pier, quay, wharf, jetty, dock or dock premises, or

       

    (v) any ship, boat, aircraft, railway wagon, motor lorry, cart, or other vessel or vehicle used for the conveyance of goods;

       

    (c) to examine all fish found in any place which he is authorised by this section to enter and for that purpose to open any package found in such place and containing or believed to contain fish;

       

    (d) to stop, enter and search, on any river, lake or estuary, or the shores thereof or any part of the sea or the shores thereof any boat used or believed to be used for fishing or containing or suspected of containing fish unlawfully captured and to examine all fish and all fishing engines found therein and for that purpose to open any package which contains or is suspected of containing any fish or fishing engine;

       

    (e) to take, remove and detain in his custody any fish (either together with or without any package in which the same may be contained) found in the course of the exercise of any of the powers conferred by this section in respect of which an offence under this Act is being or is suspected of being committed or which have been or are suspected of having been unlawfully captured;

       

    (f) to take, remove and detain in his custody any fishing engine or any article liable or believed to be liable to forfeiture under this Act;

       

    (g) to demand and take the name and address of the person having custody of any fish or other article which the authorised officer is authorised under this section to examine and also demand and take from such person the name and address of the owner of such fish or other article.

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  • How can I recognise Inland Fisheries Ireland staff? +

    Inland Fisheries Ireland officers are involved in a range of activities including high profile inspections, surveillance and intelligence operations, education and advocacy programs, fisheries development, research and prosecutions. On the river or lough bank however their main responsibility will be to ensure compliance with the varying fisheries regulations and laws.

    Checking a salmon licence

    When fishing you may at times be approached by an Inland Fisheries Ireland officer. If fishing for salmon or sea trout they will request to see your licence as well as tackle. If angling for other species they will check your compliance with the various fishing regulations and laws.

    Bike patrol

    If you are approached by an IFI working fishery officer they will be wearing official logoed work wear which may consist of a green coat and or bomber jacket, light green shirt, brown trousers and boots and possibly a green baseball type cap. All of these have identifying Inland Fisheries Ireland logos on the cap, shirt or jacket.

    Fisheries Officer afloat

    If requested to identify themselves they will be able to produce their warrants. These consist of a leather wallet; upon opening it there is an IFI badge and a photograph of the officer plus a number of warrants which allows the officer to perform his/her duties.

    Hauling in an illegal net

    There will also be logos on their vehicles (cars, vans, jeeps, quad bikes, bikes) or vessels (rigid inflatable boats (RIBS), boats, jetskis or kayaks). Officers do at times work in civilian clothing when they need to be incognito, or in drysuits or floatation suits while working in rivers or at sea. They should however still be carrying their warrants.

    Kayak patrol

    N.B. It must be noted that in some areas there are Water keepers and on the coast sea fisheries officers. These are not IFI employees and as such do not have the same work wear but carry appropriate warrants.

    Buggy patrol

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  • BIMs Fishfarm Proposal in Galway Bay +

    BIMs Fishfarm Proposal in Galway Bay

    Does IFI have concerns regarding the proposal by BIM to locate a fish farm in Galway Bay?
    IFI has expressed its concern in relation to the location and scale of the proposed fish farm in Galway Bay and how its development and operation would impact negatively on wild salmon and sea trout stocks and their habitat. IFI has also pointed out that the recognised negative impacts of sea lice on salmonids have not been adequately dealt with in the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or the associated Natura Impact Statement (NIS). Recent findings show sea lice to have devastating effects on wild salmon, accounting for up to 39% of salmon mortalities.

    IFI has provided detailed guidance on the measures required to address its key environmental concerns as part of its submission regarding the EIS and NIS Statements attached to this licence application. The compelling international evidence available to inform this issue clearly illustrates the negative links between unsustainable salmon farming and wild salmon and sea trout stocks.

    See IFIs submission and a Factsheet on the Impacts of Salmon Aquaculture on Wild Salmon and Sea Trout Stocks at http://www.fisheriesireland.ie/Notices/deep-sea-fish-farm-development-in-galway-bay-bay.html
    Press releases from IFI regarding the issues:
    http://www.fisheriesireland.ie/Press-releases/wild-salmon-survival-in-the-balance-1-may-be-the-crucial-tipping-point.html
    http://www.fisheriesireland.ie/Press-releases/national-inland-fisheires-forum-submission-to-the-department-of-agriculture-food-and-the-marine.html
    http://www.fisheriesireland.ie/Press-releases/board-of-inland-fisheries-ireland-make-a-statement-on-proposed-offshore-salmon-farm.html
    http://www.fisheriesireland.ie/Press-releases/devastating-impact-on-wild-salmon-populations-from-sea-lice.html

    Has IFI received a response to its submission?
    No response has been received to date.

    Have IFI concerns in relation to the expansion of salmon farming as proposed been met?
    No, IFIs concerns have not been met either by formal response or through the consultative process.

    Is IFI in negotiations with BIM?
    No, IFI is not in negotiations with BIM.

    Has IFI had discussions with BIM?
    IFI has offered its advice and shared its concerns relating to the associated NIS and EIS with BIM in discussions. This is not a negotiation, IFI is endeavouring to facilitate and foster an understanding of the issues raised in its submission to the EIS.

    Does IFI have concerns regarding other aquaculture proposals?
    As the state agency with responsibility for the protection, management and conservation of Ireland's inland fisheries and sea angling resources, IFI has been a consistent supporter of a sustainably developed aquaculture sector in Ireland for many years.

    IFI’s position is that all planned aquaculture developments must fully consider and mitigate against any potential adverse impact on wild salmon and sea trout stocks in surrounding waters.

    The Board of IFI have previously recommended the establishment of an independent three person group to examine the whole area of wild salmonid /  aquaculture interactions and make recommendations.

    Why has IFI not appeared in public debates or on the Prime Time programme?
    IFI has decided not to accept the opportunity to partake in public debate, as doing so might or be perceived as interfering in the formal review process which is on-going. IFI is satisfied that its submission, which is supported by international scientific studies, clearly sets out its concerns and recommended measures for mitigation.

    Will IFI provide information or clarification in relation to its concerns?

    IFI has informed the debate around this issue focusing on ensuring that any proposed salmon farm considers fully its impacts on wild salmonids; detailed information on IFI advice and observations in relation to this project are available on the IFI web site at www.fisheriesireland.ie/General/deep-sea-fish-farm-development-in-galway-bay-bay.html

    Specific questions not answered in this FAQ or in the papers available should be forwarded to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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  • How do I make a complaint? +

    Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) want to provide you with the best possible service. There may be times, however, when you think we could do better. And sometimes you may even want to tell us about something we have done well.
    Whatever age you are, you have rights when it comes to a public service including:

    • the right to have your say and be listened to
    • the right to complain if you are not happy about something we have done.

    In order to help you to do so we have set out all options open to you at the following link: Making a Comment, Compliment or Complaint

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  • FRACKING +

    FRACKING

    Q: What is IFI’s policy on Fracking?

    A: IFI will comment on any applications that come before it on the basis of its responsibilities under the Fisheries Acts, Local Government (Water Pollution) Act and EU Directives.

    Q: Has IFI commented on any Fracking Applications?

    A: No applications have come before IFI.

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  • FUNDING FOR ANGLING PROJECTS +

    Q: What is the Tús programme and how does it work?

    Please see here for information on the Tús programme.

    Q: What is LEADER and how does it work?

    LEADER funding is administered by local companies also known as Local Action Groups (LAGs) who distribute grants and other supports to projects within their areas. Please see here for further information on LEADER funding.

    Q: What is the Heritage Council Grants Programme?

    The Heritage Council Grants programme invited applications for grants in 2012 under the following headings.

    • Heritage Research provides assistance for data collection and research relating to Ireland’s heritage
    • Heritage Management supports projects that apply good heritage practice to the management of places, collections or objects (including buildings)
    • Heritage Education, Community and Outreach supports initiatives linking heritage to communities, promoting active engagement with and raising public appreciation of heritage.

    The application process is now closed for 2012 but information on grants avaialble for 2013 will be available from October 2012. See here for more details on the 2012 grants programme.

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  • SALMON CONSERVATION and Regulations +

    SALMON CONSERVATION and Regulations

    Q: What rivers / lakes are open, closed or catch and release this year?

    Please see here under the ‘Open fisheries’, ‘Catch and release only’ and ‘Closed’ tabs.

    Q: Who decides what rivers are open / closed / catch and release only and how is this decided?
    The Standing Scientific Committee (SSC) for salmon determine the conservation limit and surplus afforded to each individual salmon river within the state following which IFI Management make a recommendation on the future catch options for that river based on the best information available. These recommendations are submitted to the Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources and following a period of consultation the Minister will make a decision on the future catch options associated with each individual river.

    There are 148 listed salmon rivers in Ireland.  Each river has a given Conservation Limit.  The Conservation Limit (CL) is the number of spawning salmon required to produce the next generation of salmon. A group of expert fisheries scientists; the Scientific Standing Committee, develop the CL using the wetted area of each river along with its latitude to determine the number of salmon eggs required to populate this area. An assessment is made annually as to whether the conservation limit is reached on each river by using the average fish counter data, salmon rod catches, redd counts or by catchment wide electro-fishing from the previous 5 years of data. Following this assessment each river is given a catch option as follows subject to approval:

    • Any surplus over the CL, the river can be allocated a quota for the harvest of salmon.
    • If the river is meeting between 65% -100% of the CL the river can be opened on a ‘catch and release’ basis
    • If the river is meeting less the 65% of the CL or has a rod catch of less than 10 fish the river will be closed for salmon fishing.

    IFI forward the above advice to the Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources who makes the final decision on the catch options each year following a public consultation process.

     

    Q: What is the conservation limit for a river?
    A: The ‘conservation limit’ for a river is the number of spawning salmon required to produce the next generation of salmon.  The conservation limit is fixed for each river based on the wetted area, latitude and other river specific factors, i.e. the proportion of one sea winter salmon and multi sea winter salmon in the population, the average weight of these salmon, proportions of male and female salmon and average numbers of eggs per female fish.

    Q: How are Adult salmon Returns calculated each year?
    A: The ‘Adult salmon returns’ is determined based on the counter figures where one exists or the rod catch figures (taken from the logbooks) from the most recent 5 years of data with an average figure derived.

    Q: How is the surplus or deficit determined for each river?
    A: The ‘Surplus’ or ‘Deficit’ for each river is determined by subtracting the ‘conservation limit’ from the 5 years average ‘Adult salmon returns’ specific for each river. The % of that rivers ‘conservation limit’ being met enables IFI Management to make recommendations on the catch options association with each individual river.

    Q: What are the criteria for a river being closed / open on a catch and release basis or fully open?
    A: A river meeting less than 65% of its conservation limit will be closed for all salmon fishing (unless catchment wide electrofishing results warrant the river been opened on a catch and release basis).  A river meeting between 65% and 100% of its ‘conservation limit’ can be opened on a catch and release basis for salmon and sea trout (over 40cm).  A river exceeding 100% of its conservation limit can be open to the harvesting of salmon and sea trout if the surplus is sufficient to warrant the harvesting of salmon and sea trout and there is no danger of the quota been exceeded.

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  • How do I report illegal fishing or pollution +

    How do I report a pollution event?

    If you are concerned about the impact of any industrial or construction activity on the aquatic environment or if you discover a fish kill or suspicious discharge into a stream, river or lake you should phone 1890 34 74 24 or for easier recall 1890 FISH 24

    During normal office number you may contact the Environmental Fisheries Officer of your local Inland Fisheries Ireland office using the details below:

    • Blackrock Office. Tel: +353 1 2787022
    • Clonmel Office. Tel: + 353 52 23624
    • Macroom Office. Tel: +353 26 41221
    • Limerick Office. Tel: +353 61 300238
    • Galway Office. Tel: +353 91 563118
    • Ballina Office. Tel: +353 96 22623
    • Ballyshannon Office. Tel: +353 71 9851435

    How do I report illegal fishing or poaching?

    If you think you have witnessed someone fishing illegally or poaching you should  phone  1890 34 74 24 or for easier recall 1890 FISH 24

    During normal office number you may contact the local Inland Fisheries Ireland office using the details below:

    • Blackrock Office. Tel: +353 1 2787022
    • Clonmel Office. Tel: + 353 52 23624
    • Macroom Office. Tel: +353 26 41221
    • Limerick Office. Tel: +353 61 300238
    • Galway Office. Tel: +353 91 563118
    • Ballina Office. Tel: +353 96 22623
    • Ballyshannon Office. Tel: +353 71 9851435
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  • How is the Conservation Limit and Surplus derived ? +

    Q: How is the Conservation Limit and Surplus derived ?

    The Standing Scientific Committee (SSC) for salmon determine the conservation limit and surplus afforded to each individual salmon river within the state following which IFI Management make a recommendation on the future catch options for that river based on the best information available. These recommendations are submitted to the Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources and following a period of consultation the Minister will make a decision on the future catch options associated with each individual river.

    The ‘conservation limit’ for a river is the number of spawning salmon required to produce the next generation of salmon. The conservation limit is fixed for each river based on the wetted area, latitude and other river specific factors, i.e. the proportion of one sea winter salmon and multi sea winter salmon in the population, the average weight of these salmon, proportions of male and female salmon and average numbers of eggs per female fish.

     

    The ‘Adult salmon returns’ is determined based on the counter figures where one exists or the rod catch figures (taken from the logbooks) from the most recent 5 years of data with an average figure derived.

     

    The ‘Surplus’ or ‘Deficit’ for each river is determined by subtracting the ‘conservation limit’ from the 5 years average ‘Adult salmon returns’ specific for each river. The % of that rivers ‘conservation limit’ being met enables IFI Management to make recommendations on the catch options association with each individual river .

     

    A river meeting less than 65% of its conservation limit will be closed for all salmon fishing (unless catchment wide electrofishing results warrant the river been opened on a catch and release basis). A river meeting between 65% and 100% of its ‘conservation limit’ can be opened on a catch and release basis for salmon and sea trout (over 40cm). A river exceeding 100% of its conservation limit can be open to the harvesting of salmon and sea trout if the surplus is sufficient to warrant the harvesting of salmon and sea trout and there is no danger of the quota been exceeded.

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Deep Sea Fish Farm Development in Galway Bay Bay +

    Deep Sea Fish Farm Development in Galway Bay Bay

    Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) is the statutory authority tasked with the responsibility for the conservation, protection and development of the inland fisheries resource and recreational sea angling. Recent legislative changes (SI: 477) have also tasked IFI via the Minister for Communications Energy and Natural Resources (DCENR) with additional responsibilities as part of Ireland’s implementation of the Habitats Directive, these include responsibility for the conservation of wild salmon, pollan, shad, smelt and lamprey.

    IFI are the responsible agency in respect of the licensing and management commercial and recreational fishing for salmon, with protection responsibilities at sea out to 12 miles from baselines. Given the organisation’s close involvement with costal and island communities, IFI recognise and understand the pressures that these communities are experiencing. IFI understand clearly the impact that the closure and increased control of inshore fisheries for conservation reasons has had on these local communities. IFI is closely involved in supporting some of the former licenced commercial fishermen in their efforts to diversify out of salmon fishing.

    IFI have been concerned regarding the negative impact of salmon farming on wild sea trout and salmon stocks, particularly in Connemara, since the late 1980’s. Sea lice infestation has been a particular concern. Many of the sites chosen to locate salmon farms were in shallow bays, close to river mouths where existing wild sea trout and salmon stocks existed these were not suitable locations for farming salmon from a wild fish perspective. Multiple farms in bays with two year classes of fish in close proximity lead to husbandry problems and lack of ability to control sea lice. While there has been an improvement in sea lice control recently, aided by lower stocking densities, fewer sites, and single generation sites, some existing locations remain a threat to wild salmonid stocks due to their proximity to rivers and problems with maintaining farm lice levels at a level whereby they do not impact on wild fisheries. IFI and its predecessors the Central and Regional Fisheries Boards have consistently sought the re-location of such farms away from river mouths. In this context, the proposal for a deep sea salmon farm in a more off-shore location is a move in the right direction. While such a location is not likely to encounter the same problems associated with farms in shallow bays close to river mouths, a more off-shore deep sea location is not without potential for negative impacts of wild salmon and sea trout stocks. The scale of the present proposal is of very significant concern as it provides for a greater production tonnage of salmon at this one location than is currently being produced nationally. In the past salmon farms were considered large when they were licensed for a harvest of 2000 tons – the current proposal is for a farm harvesting 15,000 tonnes based in two sites in Galway Bay. The comments of IFI on the EIS for this proposal are set out below.

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  • Infomar +

    Use of Large Protection Vessels to police illegal fishing and co-operation with other agencies

    What are the Cosantoir Bradan and the Bradan Beatha?

    These are two Large Patrol Vessels (LPV) which were used for the monitoring of the salmon driftnet fishery in inshore waters by the predecessors to Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI), the Central and Regional Boards.

    Are these boats still in use?

    The Bradan Beatha is now used by IFI to police illegal activity in inshore waters on an on-going basis. The nature of the fishery has changed and the deployment of the Bradan Beatha is to assist in the prevention of illegal salmon fishing and augment other methods in use such as Rigid Inflatable Boat (RIB) and Personal Water Craft (PWC) patrols.

    The Cosantoir Bradan is now in use as a Geographical Survey Ireland (GSI) Survey Vessel. As and from October 11, 2012, this vessel will used as the INFOMAR Survey vessel. Information is available from www.gsi.ie.

    Are there any synergies?

    The Cosantoir Bradan will get create maps which IFI can use for the marketing of Wreck Angling. It will also provide excellent coastal mapping which will aid anglers in choosing appropriate fishing spots.

    Is this a loss of protection capacity for IFI?

    No, the nature of IFIs work has changed since the closure of the drift net fishery. Policing illegal activity needs to be immediate, effective and focused. The combined use of intelligence, RIBs, PWCs and the Bradan Beatha provide a more efficient reactive response. IFIs staff compliment has also decreased and can be better deployed on shorter, more focused operations.

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  • 1

  • What rights does an angler have to lawfully fish without being obstructed? +

    It is an offence to obstruct and angler who is fishing lawfully.

    As per the Fisheries (Consolidation) Act 1959 Part XV11, Section 287

    ‘If any person obstructs any person lawfully engaged in fishing or in proceeding to or in returning from lawful fishing, such first-mentioned person shall be guilty of an offence under this section and shall be liable on summary conviction thereof to a fine not exceeding five pounds.’
    (Hyper link: http://www.irishstatutebook.ie/1959/en/act/pub/0014/sec0287.html#sec287)

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  • What if a trout/pike or other non salmon angler catches a kelt? +

    If a kelt is caught accidentally by a an angler when fishing for a species other than sea trout or salmon he cannot record it if he does not hold a salmon licence. He must return it safely to the water immediately.


     

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  • Is it legal to kill a kelt or baggot? +

    You may not kill a kelt or baggot under Irish fisheries laws. All unseasonable salmon and trout must carefully be returned. Unseasonable fish are defined as any salmon or trout which is about to spawn, or which has spawned and has not recovered from spawning.

    ref: FISHERIES (CONSOLIDATION) ACT, 1959 - Part XI, Chapter 3, 176.

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  • What are the legal methods of taking fish in freshwater +

    Q: What are the legal methods of taking fish in freshwater?
    A: The only legal method of taking a fish (any species) in freshwater is by rod and line. – The use of nightlines & hand lines is illegal.
    Bye-law 897 of 2012 prohibits the use of any fish hooks, other than single barbless hooks, and the use of worms as bait in angling for all species of fish in the waters specified at the following link: ANGLING BYE-LAW NO. 897, 2012 [.pdf, 19 KB]

    Q. Can I use live fish as bait in freshwater?
    A. It is illegal to have or to use live fish as bait.

    Q. How many rods can I use when fishing in freshwater?
    A. A person may fish with not more than two rods at any time.

    Q: Can I leave a rod unattended?
    A: The placing of a rod unattended on the banks of any river or lake is illegal – any rod being actively used for fishing must be attended. An unattended rod is termed a fixed engine.

    Q. Can I keep a foul hooked fish?
    A. No, it is the killing and possession of foul hooked fish (i.e fish not hooked in the mouth) is prohibited.

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  • Do kelts or baggots need to be recorded in my logbook +

    Q: Do kelts or baggots need to be recorded in my logbook?
    A: Yes. All salmon (or sea trout over 40cm) caught need to be recorded in an anglers logbook. This is both a legal requirement and for gathering scientific data. Any salmon caught which is clearly a kelt from the previous season should be clearly identified as such in the entry. This is very useful data for Inland Fisheries Ireland so we appreciate anglers’ assistance in identifying such catches. If you’re not sure how to recognise a kelt see here (link to Q below).

    Q: What is a kelt?
    A: After spawning a salmon is called a kelt. A kelt is normally in poor condition but recovering to go to sea. In the act they would be termed unseasonable fish. Kelts start to drop downstream and begin eating to recover their condition. Female fish are the most likely to survive spawning because they head downstream immediately after laying their eggs. However, males remain in the vicinity of the redds looking for new females and fighting amongst themselves to mate with them. As a result, the majority of male kelts die in the rivers. The nutrients from their dead bodies are recycled into the food chain and benefit future generations.

    Q: What is a baggot?
    A baggot has different interpretations. Some say they are late running fish that never spawned or which have still to spawn. Others say they are fish which for some reason have failed to spawn at the appropriate time. In such cases the eggs may be degenerating and no longer viable. Either way baggots would also be termed unseasonable fish.

    Q: How can I identify a kelt?
    A: A kelt can be fully silvered but with a bit of a blue hue and can sometimes be mistaken for ‘clean’ fish (one which has entered the river and yet to spawn). However, kelts are in poor condition compared with clean fish, being thin and lanky in appearance with a soft body. The vent is often distended due to spawning and the belly is flat and hollow. Its fins and tail may be damaged or torn and it could have maggots in the gills. Kelts are aggressive feeders and easily caught. They often rest in slower areas of rivers.

    Q: How can I identify a baggot?
    A: Baggots are generally well proportioned and dark coloured, not dissimilar in appearance to coloured hens but their bellies are flabby. However, baggots can be distinguished from coloured hens by their soft flesh, distended bellies and sometimes open vents. Baggots can sometimes be caught in the spring on early rivers.

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  • ANGLING INFORMATION +

    ANGLING INFORMATION

    Q: Where can I find information on going fishing in Ireland?

    A: For all angling information, please refer to our angling website at http://www.fishinginireland.info/

    Q: Where can I find the current salmon angling regulations?

    A: Please see here for up to date information on salmon angling regulations in Ireland.

    Q: Where can I find out about salmon fishing in Ireland?

    Please see here for information on salmon fishing in Ireland

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  • FISHERIES AWARENESS WEEK +

    FISHERIES AWARENESS WEEK

    Q: Where can I find out about Fisheries Awareness Week?

    A: Please refer to our Fisheries Awareness website www.faw.ie for information on FAW.

    Read More
  • ANGLING PROMOTION AND DEVELOPMENT +

    Q: Is sponsorship available for angling events?

    A: Yes. However, the deadline for receipt of applications for the sponsorship in 2012 has now passed.

    IFI, depending on the availability of funds, hope to provide sponsorship (funding and/or support) to groups, associations, clubs or other appropriate bodies to assist with events/items which meet the aims of the IFI Sponsorship Programme and advance the awareness of the inland fisheries resource, recreational angling and IFI in 2013. Further details will be announced here later in the year.

    The IFI Sponsorship Programme aims to increase awareness of IFI, its work, recreational angling and the inland fisheries resource. IFI may support events on the basis of:

    • Location and nature of the Event;
    • Potential of the Event to introduce new users to angling in an active capacity, i.e. not just as spectators;
    • Educate/Inform stakeholders of angling/environmental/commercial salmon fisheries/habitat issues;
    • Development of non-established Events;
    • An even distribution of sponsorship across all angling disciplines and all River Basin Districts;
    • Events which include participants from some of the groups listed; people of different; ages, political opinion, race, religious belief, gender, marital status, sexual orientation, people with dependants, people with a disability, and members of the traveller community, are particularly welcome.

    Events which will not be considered include

    • The provision of hospitality, where the hospitality is the central or core aspect to the support sought from IFI;
    • Events where the primary function of the Event is fund-raising;
    • Events, which in the view of IFI, are economically viable without financial support from IFI; and
    • Capital projects such as acquiring or developing new or existing buildings, infrastructure development or acquiring/maintaining equipment.
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  • ACCESIBILITY +

    Q: I am a wheelchair user. Where can I go fishing in Ireland?

    A: Please follow this link to a map of disabled angling stands in Ireland.

    http://www.ifigis.ie/AccessibleAnglingMap/

     

    Q: Is there advice available on the construction of wheelchair accessible angling stands?

    A: Inland Fisheries Ireland is committed to improving and promoting access to angling facilities. Working with stakeholders we endeavour to improve the public’s angling experience.

    A guide has been developed in consultation with the National Disability Authority (NDA), People with Disabilities in Ireland (PWDI) the Irish Wheelchair Association (IWA) and the National Council for the Blind in Ireland (NCBI).

    There are many barriers experienced by disabled anglers when trying to participate in their leisure activity. For example people may have access issues where there is limited parking, fence crossings, cattle grids, steps or steep slopes. Easy and safe access to the water’s edge is critical to ensure effective participation by all.

    The guide is divided into two parts; part 1 covers the standards of facilities provided to anglers visiting a location while part 2 deals with specifications for the construction of angling platforms, pegs and swims.

    It is essential that all aspects of accessibility (parking, pathways and angling stands) be addressed collectively to ensure viable usage by all anglers.

    Please note that this is a guidance document and more detailed best practice information is available in BS 8300 Design of building and their approaches to meet the needs of disabled people and the British Disabled Angling Association guidance document. It is recommended that you consult these documents before completing the design process.

    This document shall be made available in alternative formats on request.

    IFI Guide to Accessible Angling Stands 2011.pdf

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  • 1

  • What insurances do i need to consider? +

    Insurance Requirements for Angling Clubs/Applicants 

    Each Angling Club/Applicant shall ensure that they shall effect and keep in force during the duration of the services at their own cost, with a reputable insurance company, such levels of insurance cover as may be required to meet its potential liabilities under this Agreement, which shall include, without prejudice to the generality of the foregoing:

    Public/Product Liability Insurance with the minimum limit of indemnity being no less than €6,500,000 in respect of each and every occurrence, unlimited in the period of insurance but in the annual aggregate for Products Liability. This policy should also provide confirmation that the Public/Products liability policy provides cover for;

    1. Accidental Pollution. 
    2. Member to Member Liability. 
    3. A specific indemnity in favour of Inland Fisheries Ireland and landowners. 

    Employers Liability Insurance with the minimum limit of indemnity provided being no less than €13,000,000 in respect of each and every occurrence and unlimited in the period of insurance.

    This policy shall also provide confirmation that the Employers Liability policy;

                 (1) include a specific indemnity in favour of Inland Fisheries Ireland and landowners. 

     Insurance Requirements for Contractors 

    Each Angling Club/Applicant shall ensure that their Contractor(s) shall effect and keep in force during the duration of the services at their own cost, with a reputable insurance company, such levels of insurance cover as may be required to meet its potential liabilities under this Agreement, which shall include, without prejudice to the generality of the foregoing: 

    • Public/Product Liability Insurance with the minimum limit of indemnity being no less than €6,500,000 in respect of each and every occurrence, unlimited in the period of insurance but in the annual aggregate for Products Liability. This policy should also provide confirmation that the Public/Products liability policy provides cover for accidental pollution. (Higher limit of indemnity may be required based on the specific project and the level of exposure).
    • Employers Liability Insurance with the minimum limit of indemnity provided being no less than €13,000,000 in respect of each and every occurrence and unlimited in the period of insurance. 
    • Contractors All Risks insurance to cover material loss or damage to the contract works with a sum insured for no less than the value of the contract.  
    • Professional Indemnity Insurance for those professionals who are providing design, plan or specification services for a fee, with the minimum limit of indemnity of €2 Million each and every occurrence. The cover to be maintained for a period of 6 years after the certification of completion of the services.   

    A specific indemnity should be provided on all Contractor(s) policies in favour of Inland Fisheries Ireland and the landowner).

    Each Angling Club/Applicant shall obtain and furnish confirmation to Inland Fisheries Ireland that the required relevant insurances are in place (from both the Applicant and Contractor), including the specific indemnity in favour of Inland Fisheries Ireland and landowners (for all policies) prior to the performance of any of the said services.

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  • How do I get landowner agreements? +

    You can find out the ownership of land through the land registry on www.landregistry.ie or through local knowledge. You must have consent from landowners prior to a funding application being submitted.  Proof of consent must be submitted on the relevant landowner agreement sheet accompanying the application form.  Written landowner consent is required if you need to cross someones land to gain access to the river and to ensure landowners are in agreement with the proposed works.

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  • Do i require fishing rights to carry out works on the river? +

    In general yes, title to the fishery may be in the form of a lease from Inland Fisheries Ireland, Coillte or the Electricity Supply Board.  Whatever the situation, land owner agreements must also be in place before works can proceed.

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  • How will i know if my project is within a designated site? +

    Designated sites can be classified as Natural Heritage Areas (NHA’s), Special Protected Areas (SPA’s), Special Areas of Conservation (SAC’s) or Natura 2000 site.  National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) provide a map viewer and project locator tool to outline where all the protected sites are within the country.  Use the following link to connect to the map viewer. http://webgis.npws.ie/npwsviewer/ .

    • Simply select the county and townland to view your project location on the map or use the zoom feature.
    • Turn on the layers list from the toolbar to show up any designated sites.
    • Any designated sites will show up as a series of coloured grids.
    • By selecting legend from the toolbar, you can distinguish the type of designated area identified.

    If the proposed project is within a coloured grid, the site is under protection by NPWS and you will need to contact National Parks and Wildlife Service and obtain the required permission before works can proceed.  All contact details for local wildlife officers are listed at this link. http://www.npws.ie/contactus/

    If this proposed project is in an SAC, NHA or SPA can I proceed without consulting National Parks and Wildlife Service? No
    All projects within the above areas must have a letter of authorisation from NPWS before submission.  It is advisable to use this map viewer before submitting any applications to IFI.

     

    If this proposed project is within a flood plain I need to consult the Office of Public Works (OPW) who are the lead agency for flood risk management in Ireland.

    Contact details for the OPW can be obtained from the following link http://www.opw.ie/media/OPW%20Telephone%20Directory.pdf

     

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  • How do I get a Tax Clearance Certificate? +

    TAX CLEARANCE CERT

    Assuming a customer's tax affairs are in order, the required application form for a Tax Clearance Certificate can be obtained from the Revenue Commissioners.  You must have a Tax Registration number before you can apply for a Tax Clearance Cert which is also obtained from your local tax office. 

    Angling Clubs will need to complete a registration form for voluntary non-profit making organisations available here:

    Registration form for voluntary non-profit making organisations.pdf

     

    and forward it to your local tax office.  You will be issued with a revenue registration number (tax number).  Once you have been issued with a registration number you can apply for a tax clearance certificate using form TC1 available below:

    Other applicants can also use form TC1 to apply for a Tax Clearance Certificate (assuming the applicant already has a PPS number, registration number etc.)

    Application forms can be downloaded here:

     Application for a Tax Clearance Certificate TC1.pdf

    TC1 application forms can be downloaded or completed on-line using the following weblink: http://www.revenue.ie/en/business/running/tax-clearance.html

     

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  • What else do i need to consider before applying for funding? +

    Before preparing my application i will need to consider

    • Who owns the fishing right of the fishery 
    • Do I require landowner permissions to access the site
    • I will require an Angling Club Constitution if I am an Angling club
    • I will require a Memo/Articles of Association if I am a Company
    • I will require a PPS number if I am an individual
    • Is the project within a designated site.  (SAC, NHA, SPA, Natura 2000)
    • Do I require permissions from ESB, OPW, NPWS or local Authority
    • a Minimum of 3 quotations will be require for all proposed expenditure exceeding €500.  (to ensure value for money is achieved)
    • A valid tax clearance certificate will be required by all applicants to ensure tax compliance
    • What insurances do I need to consider (i will also need to indemnify Inland Fisheries Ireland against any accident, losses, claims or liability arising from the proposed project)

    Health and Safety considerations

     

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  • What happens my application once it is lodged with IFI? +

    1. Inland Fisheries Ireland will acknowledge receipt of the application.  Each application shall be allocated a project reference number.  This reference number shall be used in all future correspondence relating to this project.  On receipt of applications each IFI Director shall review the application and assess the project in terms of its fit with the Salmon Conservation Fund Scheme. This may involve a site visit and/or discussions with the project promoter.
    2. Once the assessment is complete the IFI Director makes a recommendation on the project either ‘accepting for evaluation’ or ‘rejecting with reasons for same’.
    3. If the contributor application is rejected, you will be advised with reasons for its unsuitability by the IFI Director and recommendations for changes/improvements may be given.
    4. If the application is accepted and complete with all supporting documentation in place (including tax clearance cert, landowner permissions, IFI/NPWS/OPW/P.P. approvals etc.) the applications will be forwarded for assessment to an evaluation committee and forwarded to the Management Committee for final approval. 
    5. Letters of offer/regret will be circulated to all applicants following final approval (ideally this will be the end April or early May so works can commence from May/June onwards.  
    6. The letter of offer will be made up of a contractual agreement between IFI and the Project Promoter.  There shall be 2 copies of this agreement circulated to each project promoter for signing, one to be retained by the promoter and the other by IFI along with a Section 59 Authorisation of the Fisheries Act 2010’ permitting instream works. 

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  • What are the deadlines for submitting an application to the Fund? +

    The application process for 2016 is open with applications to be received by Thursday 31st March 2016.


     

     

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  • Where do I submit my application to? +

    Completed 'Contributor Application Forms' shall be returned to your local IFI office for the attention of the IFI Director. Addresses are given below:
     
    Salmon Conservation Fund,
    Inland Fisheries Ireland - Dublin,
    3044 Lake Drive,
    Citywest Business Campus,
    D24 Y265.

     

     

    Salmon Conservation Fund,
    Inland Fisheries Ireland – Clonmel,
    Anglesea Street,
    Clonmel,
    Co. Tipperary, E91 RD25.

     

    Salmon Conservation Fund,
    Inland Fisheries Ireland - Macroom,
    Sunnyside House,
    Macroom,
    Co. Cork, P12 X602.

     

    Salmon Conservation Fund,
    Inland Fisheries Ireland – Limerick,
    Ashbourne Business Park,
    Dock Road,
    Limerick, V94 NPEO.

     

    Salmon Conservation Fund,
    Inland Fisheries Ireland- Galway,
    Teach Breac,
    Earl's Island, 
    Galway, H91 K6D2.

     

    Salmon Conservation Fund,
    Inland Fisheries Ireland – Ballina,
    Ardnaree House,
    Abbey Street, Ballina,
    Co. Mayo, F26 NN97.

     

    Salmon Conservation Fund,
    Inland Fisheries Ireland – Ballyshannon,
    Station Road,
    Ballyshannon,
    Co. Donegal, F94 WV76.

     
     

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  • Amount of funding available? +

    It is envisaged that the fund will be divided between a range of contributor projects to a guide of €15,000 per project.  Larger scale projects will be considered which are submitted by IFI.

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  • Criteria for assessing projects? +

    Projects that have been approved by the IFI Director will be assessed by the evaluation committee.
    Projects will be assessed and scored on an 11 point scale as follows;


    1.  Conservation Limit (0-2 pts.).
         Rivers below the CL scores 2 points.
         Rivers with a CL between 100%-120% scores 1 point.
         Rivers exceeding 120% of the CL scores 0.2. 

    2. Water Quality (1-5pts)
        Based on the Q-Value a score of between 1-5 is allocated to the river.
        (A Q-value of 1 scores 1 point.  A Q-value of 5 scores 5 points).

    3.  The maximum benefit of the project to the river (1-4)
         A score of between 1-4 is allocated to the maximum benefit of each project to the river. 

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  • Who can apply? +

    Contributors to the Salmon Conservation Fund which may include angling clubs, commercial fishermen and fishery owners with an interest in a salmon fishery and who have purchased a salmon angling or commercial fishing licence.

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  • What qualifies for funding under the Salmon Conservation Fund? +

    • Fish passage improvement. (E.g. removal of barriers, modification of weirs, and construction of fish passes etc)
    • Spawning enhancement (addition/raking of gravel or cleaning of existing substrates)
    • Instream structures (weirs, deflectors, rubble mats, random boulders etc.)
    • River Bank protection (rock armour, log revetment etc.)
    • Fencing (protection of river banks including fences, stiles, cattle drinks etc.)
    • Riparian zone improvement (tree pruning and strategic tree planting)
    • Removal & control of exotic invasives (e.g. Rhododendron, Japanese knotweed, Asian Clam, Chub etc.)
    • Feasibility studies (which lead to future projects under the above headings to maximum of 50% funding or €2000 whichever is less)
    • A Screening for Appropriate Assessment, if required, may be funded to a maximum of €500. If this leads to a requirement for an Appropriate Assessment, 3 written quotes shall be required and may be funded at the discretion of IFI.      
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  • 1

  • What is the NSAD? +

    What is the NSAD?

    Inland Fisheries Ireland has consulted previously on the preparation of a National Angling Development Plan. Following its consultation and research undertaken by IFI, IFI has prepared the National Strategy for Angling Development (NSAD).

    The National Strategy for Angling Development (NSAD) 2015-2020 is the first comprehensive national framework for the development of our angling resource. The strategy will deliver a wide-ranging set of investments, innovations and promotions over the coming five years. This will ensure that our fish stocks and angling infrastructure are protected and enhanced for both their economic value and their recreational benefit to the communities and visitors they serve across Ireland. Effective and sustainable implementation of the strategy will ensure stability of existing jobs and businesses reliant on angling and the creation of new jobs as the economic impact of angling grows. 

    The strategy will also ensure that our angling resource is protected and conserved in an environmentally sustainable manner for future generations to enjoy. Fundamentally, this strategy will strive to make angling an accessible and attractive pursuit for all. In this regard, the strategy is the foremost statement of intent for the future of our angling resource since the establishment of IFI in 2010.

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  • Who can make submissions? +

    The consultation is open to all submissions. Submissions can be made by individuals, angling clubs, landowners, organisations, any other stakeholder or any other party with an interest in the development and improvement of Irish angling and/or fisheries.

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  • What format should the submission be in? +

    Submission must be in writing.

    Read More
  • Where do I send my submission? +

    A dedicated e-mail address has been set up to receive email submissions regarding the NSAD.

    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    Submissions may also be marked ‘NSAD – public consultation’ and addressed to 

    NSAD Consultation,
    3044 Lake Drive, Citywest Business Campus,
    Dublin 24,
    D24 Y265

    and must be received no later than Monday, 4th January 2016.

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  • Will all submissions be accepted? +

    Interested parties and individuals are invited to submit to IFI. Please note that submissions cannot be considered if:

    • They are submitted after the deadline of Monday, 04th January 2016;
    • They do not relate to the NSAD;
    • They contain personal accusations, irrelevant or offensive statements/material.
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  • If I am unsure as to the relevance of my submission, who can I call/email? +

    Please make your submission bearing in mind that submissions may include and are not limited to:

    • strategies for the development of angling,
    • identifying development needs or deficiencies,
    • physical development projects, novice angler initiatives,
    • evaluation criteria of fisheries status by species/discipline type (i.e. what makes a good fishery)
    • and angling/fishery support service requirements;

     Submissions can be formulated on a national, regional or local basis as necessary. 

    A dedicated e-mail address has been set up to receive email submissions regarding the NSAD. Submissions may also be marked ‘NSAD – public consultation’ and addressed to 

    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    or

    NSAD Consultation,
    3044 Lake Drive, Citywest Business Campus,
    Dublin 24,
    D24 Y265

    and must be received no later than Monday, 4th January 2016.

    The consultation is open to all submissions. If you are unsure as to the relevance of your submission then forward it by the closing date to the above address and let IFI evaluate it; all submissions will be evaluated on the basis that there are no bad ideas. 

    Read More
  • Will submissions be responded to? +

    Submissions received will not be responded to on an individual basis but they will be taken into consideration by IFI in its final report.

    Read More
  • Will the submissions be made public? +

    Please be aware that all submissions received by IFI will be published on its website. In addition IFI is subject to the provisions of the Freedom of Information Act 1997 and therefore has to consider any request made to it under that Act.

    If you consider that any part of your submission would be subject to any of the statutory exclusions under that Act please so indicate in your submission, specifying under which exemption you believe the content should be excluded.

    Read More
  • When will the NSAD report be complete and published? +

    The NSAD report was published in November 2015. There is currently a period of public consultation on the published report.

    Read More
  • Who is working on the NSAD for IFI? +

    A team comprising Kevin Crowley, Myles Kelly, Markus Muller, Shane O’ Reilly and Paul O’ Reilly are working on the formulation of the NSAD. The group reports to Suzanne Campion Head of Business Development.

    Qualifications held include:

    • Angling Coach Tutor
    • Bachelor of Arts in Economics & Philosophy
    • Bachelor of Commerce ( Marketing)
    • Bachelor of Commerce ( Accounting & Law)
    • Bachelor of Science
    • Bachelor of Science Environmental Science
    • Bachelor of Science Environmental Management
    • Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants
    • GAIA fly tying instructor
    • GAIA single handed casting instructor
    • Level 1 Angling Coach
    • Marine & Countryside Guide (FETAC)
    • Master of Arts Public Management Master of Commerce Degree (Economics)
    • Master of Science in Hydrology & Geography
    • Master of Science in Information Technology for Strategic Management
    • Post Graduate Diploma in Fisheries Management
    • Post Graduate Diploma in Computing
    • Project Management

    All are IFI staff and have between them over 50 years of angling marketing, promotion and product development experience, 16 years fisheries management, 17 years in fisheries protection, 17 years in angling services provision, 40 years in stakeholder  and lesser amounts spent in policy formulation, education and outreach and fisheries development. The team have angling experience in excess of 140 years.

    The team also have support from other IFI staff who have vast experience in angling marketing, stakeholder engagement, fisheries development, management and protection.

    IFI have invited external expertise from Failte Ireland.

    Read More
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  • Why is there a need for stock management operations? +

    Stock Management is undertaken/required on certain waters for the conservation of wild brown trout in waters which are managed by IFI as wild brown trout fisheries. Such waters are identified in IFIs pike and trout management policies. These stock management operations are informed by scientific research, are based on best practice and carried out in accordance with IFIs pike and trout management policies under strict standard operating procedures. 

    Further information on the above policies and standard operating procedure can be obtained at

    Further information on the operating procedures for stock management through gillnetting and electrofishing can be found here:

    The research used to inform the policies is available here:

    Map indicating where pike management operations are conducted

    Map of managed pike lakes
    A map showing where pike management operations are conducted
  • Where will pike management operations be carried out? +

    Pike management operations are only carried out on 7 lakes in Ireland. These are:

    • Loughs Corrib, Mask and Carra
    • Lough Conn and Cullen
    • Lough Sheelin
    • Lough Arrow

    Netting operations on Cullen have been suspended pending an evaluation of new electrofishing techniques.

    Map of managed pike lakes
    A map showing where pike management operations are conducted
  • Are all pike being culled +

    No. Inland Fisheries Ireland does not indiscriminately kill pike but conducts surveys and implements stock management programmes in accordance with our management policy on a small number of lakes which are designated by IFI as wild brown trout fisheries. 

    Why is pike management required? Is it effective?

    IFI have conducted surveys and scientific studies over a number of decades, in relation to the impact of predation by pike on wild Brown Trout. Based on the best available scientific advice, IFI have identified a number of internationally important wild Brown Trout fisheries upon which pike management will be conducted. This management regime aims to sustain optimum stock densities of Brown Trout so that they continue to function as premier trout angling resources.

    Many years of pike management operations on this small number of designated trout lakes has demonstrated that pike management operations have been extremely effective at maintaining good stock densities of trout. Research pertaining to pike management on wild brown trout fisheries is on-going both in Ireland and internationally.

  • Are all pike captured during stock management operations being killed? +

    No, not all pike are killed during stock management operations. Where possible all pike over 85cm considered fit and likely to survive are released unharmed. When the larger electrofishing boat is being utilised and weather conditions are suitable pike under 85cms considered fit and likely to survive may be retained for transfer to another lake – should one be available. Unfortunately, a number of unavoidable casualties are sustained during these operations. Pike that are unlikely to survive are euthanized by IFI staff. This is done in a humane manner as set out under the Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for Pike management operations.

    Further information on the operating procedures for stock management through gillnetting and electrofishing can be found here:

  • How were these policies formulated? +

    The substantive body of work was undertaken by Policy Development Groups comprised of relevant IFI staff and members of the key stakeholder groups. Each of the groups was chaired by a Senior Research Officer from IFI. In the case of the pike and trout polices stakeholders representing each angling discipline (pike angling and trout angling) were represented on each policy group. Inputs were then received from the National Inland Fisheries Forum, the Department of Communications Energy and Natural Resources and also other relevant State Agencies.

  • How can the policy recommendations be changed +

    The current pike and trout policies are for a period of three years from the date of launch. Thse will be reviewed after 3 years. The policy review process will be set out in advance of the review and submissions may be submitted through the appropriate channel at that time.

  • Are there any legislative changes being proposed regarding pike management? +

    Yes, certain changes are proposed in the two policies referred to above. In the event that there is a legislative change please participate in the relevant consultative process at the time which will be advertised in the National media and on the IFI website.

  • How many pike have been killed in this year’s operations? +

    During stock management operations on occasions pike are removed and when pike are euthanized records are maintained and at the end of the year will be made available on the IFI website. Details of this year’s stock management are available online at www.fisheriesirelandpikestats.ie (page to be developed)

  • Is it possible to look into the tanks or board IFI boats during operations or assist in the operations? +

    Due to the hazardous nature of the work and the dangers present we are unable to allow you to enter the work areas. Under health and safety regulations you must remain at least 20 metres from the work area. If you wish to observe management operations, you may do so only from a safe distance.

  • Is there a supervisor/spokesperson who can explain procedures during operations? +

    Each operational area has a designated person who will be happy to answer questions . This person will be able to provide contact details for management should you require further information. Furthermore comments, compliments or complaints may be registered on 

    http://www.fisheriesireland.ie/About-Us/making-a-comment-compliment-or-complaint.html 

    A list of IFI offices can be found at the link below

    http://www.fisheriesireland.ie/About-Us/contact-us.html 

  • What happens to the fish that are killed? +

    A proportion of fish taken during stock management operations will be used for scientific purposes. Each fish will be measured, weighed, aged and have their stomach contents examined. This information will be analysed to provide information on the age cohorts of each fish species present, their relative growth rates, their feeding patterns and other relevant information. Fish scales will be retained for possible subsequent genetic or other use. Any fish in excess of those required for scientific research will be disposed of using an approved animal rendering service.

  • How can comments, compliments or complaints regarding the implementation of the pike policy be registered with IFI? +

    Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) wants to provide you with the best possible service. There may be times when you think we can improve our service and/or there may be times you want to tell us about something you are not happy about. 

    Whatever age you are, you have rights including:

    • the right to have your say and be listened to.
    • the right to complain if you are not happy about something we have done.

    You may submit your comment, compliment or complaint by following the procedure outlined at the link below.

    http://www.fisheriesireland.ie/About-Us/making-a-comment-compliment-or-complaint.html

  • The practice of pike management varies considerably from that which takes place in the UK. Why is this? +

    Pike management operations carried out by IFI are specifically for stock management in the context of large Irish wild brown trout lakes, which are an ecologically unique resource in western Europe. Very different to anything in the UK because the ecological balance of fish stocks in various waters in the UK, are mostly either coarse fisheries or put & take rainbow trout fisheries.

     

     

    Optimal trout stocks are maintained in specifically designated waters for both angling and conservation purposes. This provides substantial tourism benefits to local economies. There are a vast number of other suitable lakes where pike numbers are not reduced and these mixed fisheries similarly provide tourism and recreational benefits in their own regions.

  • What is the duration of the 2016 stock management programme?  +

    Management operations (gill netting)take place during February, March and April with a maximum of four weeks spent in each of the trout lakes with the exception of Lough Cullin(all electrofishing). Intermittent electrofishing operations are carried out thereafter on the six lakes throughout the late spring/summer period and target mainly juvenile pike. 

     

  • I have seen footage on Youtube, when was this recorded? +

    The footage recently released on Youtube was recorded in March 2015. The operations occurred on a managed wild brown trout lake and were being carried out as a result of agreed pike and trout policies adopted by IFI and angling stakeholder groups in 2014. 

     

  • Has anything changed since the Youtube recording was made? +

    All stock management operations ceased  and IFI produced an SOP to improve standards. Officers also received training in fish handling and working on operations in potentially hostile circumstances. IFI recommenced operations in March 2016 and these operations will be carried out in in line with the standard operating procedures, going forward.

     

  • I consider the use of gill netting inappropriate in modern fisheries management, why is it acceptable to IFI? +

    IFI has prepared two Standard Operating Procedures and once equipment is in place will be moving towards the use of electrofishing where possible. Gill nets are used extensively for fisheries research across Europe.  Often gill nets are used for commercial pike fishing, recreational netting and stock management is a number of European countries such as Sweden and UK/Northern Ireland. 

     

  • What happens to the trout and coarse fish caught in the gill nets? +

    Any trout which are expected to survive are released after removal from the nets.

  • Are figures available for coarse fish? +

        Perch Roach Bream
    2012 Corrib 172 2413  
    Mask 30 394  
    Carra 86 0  
      288 2807  
    2013 Corrib 28 370  
    Mask 25 101  
    Carra 70 3  
      123 474  
    2014 Corrib 141 1076  
    Mask 21 516  
    Carra 65 0  
      227 1592  
    2015 Corrib 107 765 70
    Mask 36 88 20
    Carra 104 0 0
      247 853 90
  • Does IFI know the economic value of Pike and Trout angling ? +

  • How much does the stock management programme cost? +

  • Where can I view research regarding Pike management? +

  • Why are anglers permitted to kill trout in the lakes where trout stocks are of concern? +

    Trout stocks on the managed wild brown trout are not considered to be threatened. The principal aim of pike management operations is to maintain optimum trout stock densities for angling and conservation purposes. Some trout anglers retain fish for their own consumption but catch and release is now commonly practiced. IFI promotes catch and release, however legislation would be required to make it mandatory. 

     

  • I thought that gill nets are banned in the EU.Is this not the case? +

    Gill nets are not banned in the EU. They are used extensively for fisheries research across Europe.  Often gill nets are used for commercial pike fishing, recreational netting and stock management is a number of European countries such as Sweden and UK/Northern Ireland. 

     

  • Why are IFI allowed to take pike in contravention of the Pike Bye-laws. +

    IFI have an exemption in relation to taking fish in all Irish waters, this is for research and  management purposes. There is also a plan to modify the current Bye-laws to permit anglers to take pike from the designated wild brown trout fisheries, as recommended in the current policies.

     

  • 1

The following frequently asked questions are in regard to the development of the policies on the management of Wild Brown Trout, Pike and Bass in 2014.

  • What is this policy review and public consultation all about? +

    Inland Fisheries Ireland has launched a public consultation on the management of pike in designated wild brown trout fisheries. The Board of Inland Fisheries Ireland has decided to commence a review period of its policies on the management of Wild Brown Trout, Pike and Bass which were initially developed in 2014. A consultation process will now commence and will focus initially on pike management.

    Inland Fisheries Ireland recognises the diverse opinions of stakeholders regarding the management of pike in wild brown trout fisheries and welcomes the opportunity to engage on this issue. All interested parties are invited to make submissions which will be comprehensively reviewed and considered by the newly appointed Pike and Wild Brown Trout Policy Review Group. This group comprises of a range of representatives from all disciplines within Inland Fisheries Ireland.

  • What is Inland Fisheries Ireland’s current policy regarding the management of pike in wild brown trout fisheries? +

    Currently stock management is undertaken on certain waters for the conservation of wild brown trout waters which are managed by Inland Fisheries Ireland as wild brown trout fisheries. Such waters are identified in Inland Fisheries Ireland’s pike and trout management policies. Further information on current policies and procedures is available here: http://www.fisheriesireland.ie/FAQ/faq.html

  • How do I make a submission to this consultation and how long have I got? +

    All submissions must be made in writing and will be published on the Inland Fisheries Ireland website www.fisheriesireland.ie .

    Submissions should be marked ‘Public consultation – Pike Management in Brown Trout Fisheries’ and be submitted by email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or by post to:

    Policy Review

    Inland Fisheries Ireland

    Sunnyside House

    Macroom

    Co. Cork

     

    The Public Consultation period will run for four weeks and the closing date for receipt of submissions is 5pm on Thursday, 1st of December 2016.

  • This Policy Review was due to start in July 2016. Why has there been a delay? +

    In 2014, Inland Fisheries Ireland developed policies on the management of Wild Brown Trout, Pike and Bass. These policies were scheduled to be reviewed in 2017, however recognising the concerns of some stakeholders in relation to the pike and wild brown trout policies, the Board of Inland Fisheries Ireland decided to bring forward the review period for the pike and wild brown trout policies and commence the process in 2016. 

    Given the interrelationship between pike and wild brown trout and the experiences from the initial policy development groups, it was decided to combine the review group and consider both policies in tandem and Terms of Reference were developed in July 2016 to this effect. However, on review, the Board of Inland Fisheries Ireland determined that rather than review the policies in tandem, it would be more effective to review the element of greatest debate first, that is the management of pike in designated wild brown trout fisheries. As a result, revised Terms of Reference were drawn up and a new Public Consultation Process launched.

  • Why has Inland Fisheries Ireland changed the Terms of Reference? +

    Inland Fisheries Ireland recognised the concerns of some stakeholders in relation to the pike and wild brown trout policies and the interrelationship between pike and wild brown trout. As there are many more issues than just the areas where they overlap, it was decided to separate the policy reviews and initially focus on the management of pike in designated wild brown trout fisheries. The other policy reviews will be dealt will subsequently.

  • What were the original Terms of Reference for the Pike & Wild Brown Trout Policy Review Group? +

  • What is the difference between the initial review group’s terms of reference and the new one? +

    Inland Fisheries Ireland initially planned to review the general policies for Pike and Wild Brown Trout in tandem; the revised terms of reference require the review group to only consider the management of pike in designated wild brown trout fisheries.

  • What will this new review consider? +

    Please see the ‘Terms of Reference:  Terms of Reference

  • Who is on the Pike and Wild Brown Trout Policy Review Group from Inland Fisheries Ireland? +

    The Pike and Wild Brown Trout Policy Review Group comprises of a range of representatives from all disciplines within Inland Fisheries Ireland.

    • Mr Sean Long –Director, South Western River Basin District (Chairman)
    • Dr Sam Sheppard – Population Modeller, Inland Fisheries Ireland Research & Development
    • Mr Declan Cooke – Inspector, Western River Basin District
    • Ms Josie Mahon – Inspector, Eastern River Basin District
    • Mr Paul O’ Reilly – Economic Research & Angling Advisor, Business Development Division 
    • Mr Myles Kelly – Secretariat to Group, Inland Fisheries Ireland
  • When is the Group going to start its review? +

    The Review Group will meet in early November and will invite Angling Representatives to meet with them towards the end of November.

  • When will the pike and wild brown trout policy reviews actually commence? +

    The review process will commence in late July 2016, see the IFI Procedure on Policy Development

  • Is the review in-house only or will stakeholders be involved? +

    The review process will involve extensive consultation with stakeholders – see the IFI Consultation Policy

  • What set timescale and format will the reviews take place? (e.g. public consultation process; review meeting / forum; policy formulation period; stakeholder review and agreement of policy; sign off by IFI; publication) +

    See the indicative timeline below

      Indicative Timetable

  • What is the proposed staff make-up of the IFI review panel? +

    The review panel will consist of 5 IFI staff from the Operations, Research and Business Development Divisions.

  • Who will chair the review? +

    A member of the Policy Group will act as Chair. Please note that responsibility for policy formulation rests with the Board of IFI and any internal group will be charged with presenting a report for consideration by the Board

  • How many anglers and from what representative groups will any review panels be made up of? +

    No anglers or representative groups will be on the policy group; however, there will be two rounds of consultation and full transparency as all submissions and rationale will be made available. IFI is also in the process of establishing the second cycle of the National Inland Fisheries Forum (NIFF) which has been redesigned to take account of angling interests (28 places have been formally reserved for angling groups representing the main Federations). The NIFF will be consulted in relation to the policy reviews.

  • Will domestic angling tourism interests be represented on the review panel? +

    See answer above to question  - How many anglers and from what representative groups will any review panels be made up of ?

  • Will overseas angling tourism interests be represented on the review panel? +

    See answer above to question  - How many anglers and from what representative groups will any review panels be made up of ?

  • Will Fáilte Ireland be represented on the review panel? +

    See answer above to question  - How many anglers and from what representative groups will any review panels be made up of ?

  • Will independent scientific interests be invited and represented? +

    The Policy Group will request scientific and other information required. The information will be made available online. The Research & Development Division of IFI will be tasked with collating and presenting the scientific advice. They will take all scientific information into account in this process. They were, are and will remain independent in respect of management decisions.

  • Will IFI make available in a timely period, prior to the commencement of the review process, all relevant scientific data pertaining to the pending review? +

    Yes. IFI is committed to conducting this process as transparently as possible. The Policy Group will endeavour to meet the timelines outlined in Indicitave timetable in above question regarding timescale and review. All information supporting the policy which goes to public consultation will be made available.

  • Why are pike still classified as non-native by Inland Fisheries Ireland within the context of the EU Water Framework directive? +

    Up until approximately 10,000 years ago Ireland was covered by ice. It was following the last glaciation that the fish species which are considered as ‘native’ first colonised the country. They did not colonise the country all at once, nor evenly, and in this regard it was likely that species spread from the original point of entry, and likely some followed the retreating ice sheets. In this regard, the primary fresh water type following post glacial colonisation was oligotrophic (i.e. cold, species and nutrient poor) which favours salmonid fish species such as salmon, trout, sea trout and char. While Dr Pedreschi’s paper suggests that pike are native to Ireland, which is new and exciting information, they may not be native to the entire country and may have remained in discrete geographical locations until more recent times where their range significantly expanded. WFD monitoring programme classifies fish species to one of four categories (1. Domesticated, 2. Non-native benign, 3. Non-native non-benign and 4. Invasive requiring management), in which pike were classified as non-native non-benign (Kelly et al., 2008; King et al., 2011).  Results of the IFI funded research programme proposed, for the first time, the existence of two main demographic units in the Irish pike population and showed that these may correspond to two independent and temporally staggered colonisation events, the first of which may have been too old to be caused or assisted by human translocations (Pedreschi et al. 2013; Pedreschi et al., 2015).  This finding has stimulated an amount of debate in the scientific press and the interpretation has been questioned by Ensing (2014) who proposed that human intervention approximately 4,000 years ago may have been required for pike to colonise Irish waters.  Pedreschi et al. (2013) recommended that further investigation using genomic techniques is necessary to confirm their hypothesis.

    Therefore, while pike may be considered native or at least “naturalised” in some catchments the species is not native or “naturalised” in all catchments in Ireland.  The classification of pike is being reviewed by IFI and will be updated in due course once some of the recommendations of the study are initiated and further research is undertaken.

    References Ensing (2014) Pike could have been an exclusive human introduction to Ireland after all: a comment on Pedreschi et al. (2014) Journal of Biogeography, 42, 604-607. Kelly, F.L., Harrison, A., Connor, L., Allen, M., Rosell, R. and Cham, T. (2008) North South Shared Aquatic Resource (NS Share) Lakes Project: Fish in Lakes, Task 6.9: Classification Tool for Fish in lakes Final Report.  Unpublished report.  King, J.J., Marnell, F., Kingston, N., Rosell, R., Boylan, P., Caffrey, J.M., Fitzpatrick, U., Gargan, P.G., Kelly, F.L., O’ Grady, M.F., Poole, R., Roche, W.K. and Cassidy, D. (2011) Ireland Red List No. 5: Amphibians, reptiles and Freshwater Fish.  National Parks and Wildlife Service, Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Dublin, Ireland.

    Pedreschi, Kelly-Quinn, M., Caffrey, J., O’ Grady, M. and Mariani, S. (2013) Genetic structure of pike (Esox lucius) reveals a complex and previously unrecognized history of Ireland.  Journal of Biogeography, 41 (3), 548-560. Pedreschi, D. and Mariani, S. (2015) Towards a balanced view of pike in Ireland: a reply to Ensing.  Journal of Biogeography, 42, 602-609.

  • What are the recommendations of the previous policy reviews? +

    The recommendations are contained within each of the policy documents and can be downloaded from the following link:

  • The policy groups worked on the policies from October 2011 to February 2012, why are they only being issued now? +

    As the process involves a number of rounds of consultations and due to the importance attached to the subject matter, serious consideration was given to the content and recommendations of the policy documents before being finalised for release.

  • Were anglers consulted? +

    Angling federations and industry representatives participated on the Policy Development Groups.

  • What is the National Angling Development Plan (NADP)? +

    IFI is in the process of compiling the NADP. This will be a comprehensive listing of all development and conservation measures identified by IFI that will ensure the sustainability of the inland fisheries and sea angling resources from both an environmental and economic standpoint. All species and regions of Ireland will be included. 

    Update - 20/02/15

    IFI is now seeking input regarding the substance of the plan and submissions are invited which may include: strategies for the development of angling, physical development projects, novice angler initiatives, evaluation criteria of fisheries status by species/discipline type (i.e. what makes a good fishery) and angling/fishery support service requirements.

    For more information see:

    Public Consultation - National Angling Development Plan

     

  • If I disagree with any of the recommendations contained in the policies and want to get them changed, what can I do? +

    The policies are for a period of three years from the date of launch. There will be a review of them after this time. Any concerns you may have can be brought to your representative organisation and they can be highlighted by the organisation at the time of the review. In the event that your concern relates to a proposed legislative change, please participate in the relevant consultative process at that time.

  • How will research that has taken place since the formulation of the policies be incorporated? +

    IFI considers the full gambit of available research when formulating policies and operational implementation programmes. Research which has taken place, is on-going or yet to start will be fully considered when preparing the implementation plans arising from these policies and again when the policies are reviewed.

  • Has any commitment been received from the Department to act on the legislative changes recommended in the reports and, if so, is there any timeframe for the introduction of these changes? +

    The Department are supportive of the policies and will assist in the preparation of the required legislation. It is intended to hold consultation on the measures over the winter months with a view to having measures in place for the next angling season.

  • Angler Contribution +

    At least one of the reports (pike) recommends that ‘anglers should contribute towards the protection, management, development and promotion of angling…’.  What is the status of this recommendation and what is the latest position regarding reports that the government and IFI were considering the introduction of a general levy/ licence fee for anglers?

    IFI has adopted the policies and recommendations contained within the polices and will endeavour to move forward with them collaboratively. IFI agrees that anglers should contribute towards the protection, management, development and promotion of angling and IFI has facilitated ways in which this can be done through its various funding schemes which empower anglers to undertake conservation and promotion works. IFI has provided a 24 Hour Confidential Hotline 1980 34 74 24 through which anglers and the general public can report incidences to assist in the protection, conservation etc of pike fisheries.

    With regard to the introduction of a general levy/licence fee for anglers, a recent press release from the Department of Communication, Energy and Natural Resources stated ‘Minister for Natural Resources, Fergus O Dowd TD has confirmed that a compulsory charge for anglers will not be introduced in the context of the proposed new inland fisheries legislation. He has also stated there is no such proposal for consideration.

    The context for new legislation is the need to overhaul the current legislative code governing the sector to ensure it is fit for purpose.

    The former Minister of State has made repeatedly clear that he wished to see the fullest possible level of consensus amongst stakeholders before any proposals are developed and finalised. He also gave a commitment at recent meetings with the Angling Bodies that no proposal will be finalised until the current round of inter-federation discussions are complete. 

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