Current and archived press releases from Inland Fisheries Ireland.

Galway Man Convicted of Poaching Offence

Wednesday, 22nd February 2017: At a sitting of the District Court at Galway on the 7th of February 2017, Judge Mary Fahy convicted Mr. Gerry Farragher of Rinnaharney, Annaghdown, Co. Galway, for the illegal use of a net to catch salmon, in breach of Section 96 of the Fisheries Act, 1959. Mr. Farragher pleaded guilty to the charge in court.

Solicitor Dioraí Ford, representing Inland Fisheries Ireland, outlined the facts of the case. Mr. Ford explained that Fisheries Officers had found the net in question on Lough Corrib at 3.10am on the night of the 5th of July, 2016. The officers lay in wait until 11.25am when Mr Farragher approached the area and serviced the net by wading from the shore to an island. On leaving the area he was apprehended by the Fisheries Officers on duty.

Mr. Farragher told the Judge that it was only a small bit of net on his own land however Judge Fahy disagreed, commenting that wild salmon are very scarce these days. She also pointed out that it would be cheaper to visit a restaurant to eat salmon rather than paying fines in court.

Judge Fahy heard that Mr. Farragher had been convicted and fined in 2014 for netting and taking salmon from the same area. Mr. Farragher confirmed that he had paid his previous fines, and the judge stated that if he persisted in this activity, a prison sentence would be considered if he appeared before the court again.

Mr. Farragher was fined €500 plus costs of €600 and given six months to pay while the net in question was forfeited.

Dr Ciaran Byrne, CEO of Inland Fisheries Ireland said: “Lough Corrib is one of Ireland’s renowned angling destinations, known for its wild brown trout and salmon fishing. It is a shame to see individuals continuing to illegally fish the area, an action which is essentially an environmental crime.

We are delighted with the outcome of this case which highlights that those who are caught will be held accountable. Our Fisheries Officers patrol the waterways in overt and covert operations with a view to protecting the wild fish populations in this area.”

For more information on Inland Fisheries Ireland, visit www.fisheriesireland.ie

ENDS

For further information:
Órla Sheils
Communications Manager
Tel: (01) 8842673
E: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Note for Editors:

Inland Fisheries Ireland is a statutory body operating under the aegis of the Department of Communications, Climate Action and the Environment and was established under the Fisheries Act on 1st July 2010. Its principal function is the protection and conservation of the inland fisheries resource. Inland Fisheries Ireland will promote, support, facilitate and advise the Minister on, the conservation, protection, management, development and improvement of inland fisheries, including sea angling and develop and advise the Minister on policy and national strategies relating to inland fisheries and sea angling.

 

Inland Fisheries Ireland Staff Celebrate International Day of Women and Girls in Science

Friday, 10th of February 2017: Pictured ahead of International Day of Women and Girls in Science (11th of February 2017) are women working within Inland Fisheries Ireland who work across science projects as part of their job remit.

International Day of Women and Girls in Science is a UN initiative which aims to help achieve full and equal access to and participation in science for women and girls. Staff working in Inland Fisheries Ireland carry out scientific fisheries research, monitoring and investigations which aim to manage, improve and protect the inland fisheries resource.

To find out more about Inland Fisheries Ireland, visit www.fisheriesireland.ie . For more information on International Day of Women and Girls in Science, visit http://www.un.org/en/events/women-and-girls-in-science-day/ .

Inland Fisheries Ireland staff celebrate International Day of Women and Girls in Science
Inland Fisheries Ireland staff celebrate International Day of Women and Girls in Science

 

ENDS

For media information:

Órla Sheils
Communications Manager
E: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
T: (01) 8842673

 

Note to Editors:

About Inland Fisheries Ireland

Inland Fisheries Ireland is a statutory body operating under the aegis of the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment (DCCAE) and was established under the Fisheries Act on 1st July 2010. Its principal function is the protection and conservation of the inland fisheries resource. Inland Fisheries Ireland promotes, supports, facilitates and advises the Minister on the conservation, protection, management, development and improvement of inland fisheries, including sea angling. Inland Fisheries Ireland also develops policy and national strategies relating to inland fisheries and sea angling and advises the Minister on same.

New research reveals new information about sea trout in Irish Sea set to inform conservation management

Inland Fisheries Ireland launches Celtic Sea Trout Project Report following Irish-Welsh Collaboration

Friday, 27th of January 2017: Inland Fisheries Ireland has published a new report called The Celtic Sea Trout Project (CSTP) which addresses significant knowledge gaps around sea trout. This migratory trout has a significant fisheries value however some sea trout fisheries in parts of Ireland and the UK bordering the Irish Sea are suffering decline.

The project, which consisted of a multi-agency partnership investigation into sea trout stocks and fisheries of rivers entering the Irish Sea, aimed to address the knowledge gaps, and identify the causes of decline with a view to supporting potential management solutions. Current understanding suggests that the incidence of sea trout and the composition and status of their stocks is sensitive to changes in the environments in which they live. These life history features and the sea trout’s widespread occurrence, make it a unique and potentially sensitive indicator of environmental change.

The structure of the Irish Sea and the variety of rivers draining to it, ranging from the mountainous rivers of West Wales to the lowland rivers of East Ireland, meant there was a wide range of marine and freshwater environments for the study. Funded under the INTERREG IVA Ireland Wales Programme, the Celtic Sea Trout Project was the first project in Ireland and the UK to combine a variety of disciplines in the study of sea trout and their fisheries on a large scale.

Dr Willie Roche, Senior Research Officer, Minister Sean Kyne T.D. and Dr Cathal Gallagher, Head of Research at Inland Fisheries Ireland at the launch of the Celtic Sea Trout Project
Dr Willie Roche, Senior Research Officer, Minister Sean Kyne T.D. and Dr Cathal Gallagher, Head of Research at Inland Fisheries Ireland
at the launch of the Celtic Sea Trout Project

 

Sean Kyne TD, Minister with responsibility for Inland Fisheries said, “I particularly welcome this report and the exemplary collaboration between Irish researchers at Inland Fisheries Ireland and other bodies and their international counterparts.  The research has resulted in a better understanding of the Sea Trout stocks in the Irish and Celtic seas and this will underpin logical and well-informed decisions on the management requirements that are needed to safeguard these stocks into the future and to ensure the maximum social and economic contribution is secured”.

Dr Cathal Gallagher, Head of Research at Inland Fisheries Ireland said: “This is a ground-breaking multi-agency partnership investigation which aims to fill some of the information gaps around sea trout conservation. The first study of its kind, the Celtic Sea Trout Project is a wide-scale comprehensive, cross-disciplinary project which has provided valuable insight into many important research needs in this area, which were first identified at the International Symposium on Sea Trout in 2004. Its primary purpose of improving understanding of sea trout stocks in order to support better management in the freshwater and marine environments has been achieved.”

The research will improve the management and long term future of sea trout in the Irish Sea by providing information and advice for management which can be translated into fishery and conservation benefits for countries bordering the Irish Sea. It has also established a wider awareness and long term network of people working to secure the future of sea trout.

Partners in the Celtic Sea Trout Project included: Inland Fisheries Ireland, Bangor University, University College Cork, Natural Resources Wales, the Environment Agency (England), Isle of Man Government, Nith District Salmon Fisheries Board, Galloway Fisheries Trust, Annan District Salmon Fisheries Board and Buccleuth Estate (Border Esk). Subcontractors included APEM Ltd, Cefas and Fishskill Consultancy Services.

For more information about Inland Fisheries Ireland, visit www.fisheriesireland.ie . To view the full report, visit: http://celticseatrout.com/downloads/technical-report/. A summary of the key research findings can be found below.

ENDS

Notes to Editor

Key findings from the project included:

  1. There are nine major genetically distinct and phylogeographic sea trout groups discovered within the Irish Sea. The genetic data showed that sea trout in the Irish Sea originate from a large number of rivers and are distributed widely. Although the majority of sea trout occurred in marine waters in the vicinity of the rivers in which they originated, some migrated up to 300 kilometres for feeding purposes.

  2. Sea trout abundance, based on angling catches, varied considerably over time and between rivers and regions around the Irish Sea but catches were shown to demonstrate a degree of synchronous variation pointing to some common factor/s influencing different stocks or entry period into rivers. The river size and the fishing effort in the area was recognised as a dominant factor controlling the catch. It also discovered that shorter rivers of low alkalinity in areas with poor nutrients, but which had good spawning and nursey areas that were easily accessible from the sea, tended to be the better sea trout rivers.

  3. Sea trout growth, which is strongly tied to environmental factors of temperature and food, is an important measure of subsequent smolting and of marine survival. The spatial variation in marine growth in sea trout in this research was significantly positively correlated with mean annual sea temperature. Fish from more northerly rivers were smaller at age .0+ (finnock) and .1+ (maiden) than fish from southerly rivers.

  4.  Sea trout diet at sea is mainly fish-based and their preference for high protein/lipid prey can be met by sand eel or sprat, depending on which is available. Enhanced feeding opportunities are a major factor in determining the benefit of trout migration to the sea and sea trout are dependent on these keystone prey species (sand eel and sprat), as are many other marine fish and bird species. The study demonstrated that the marine habitat and ecosystems are strongly structured. The combinations of current, depth, seasonal fronts, temperature and salt content within this marine environment appear to influence productivity and growth opportunity for sea trout.

  5. Various models (e.g. hydrodynamic (marine), freshwater production, growth and riverine population dynamic models) were developed over the course of the CSTP project which will contribute to enhancing the decision making framework for managers of sea trout in both the freshwater and marine environments. These will be particularly important in contributing to understanding the potential impact of climate change for sea trout and other species.

 For further information:

Órla Sheils
Communications Manager
Tel: (01) 8842673
E: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

About Inland Fisheries Ireland

Inland Fisheries Ireland is a statutory body operating under the aegis of the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment (DCCAE) and was established under the Fisheries Act on 1st July 2010. Its principal function is the protection and conservation of the inland fisheries resource. Inland Fisheries Ireland promotes, supports, facilitates and advises the Minister on the conservation, protection, management, development and improvement of inland fisheries, including sea angling. Inland Fisheries Ireland also develops policy and national strategies relating to inland fisheries and sea angling and advises the Minister on same.

 

First salmon of 2017 has been caught in Cork say Inland Fisheries Ireland

Monday, 6th February 2017: The first salmon of 2017 has been caught in the Careysville Fishery on the Munster Blackwater on the opening day of the river, according to Inland Fisheries Ireland. Angler Ronan O’Connor caught a fresh run salmon on Wednesday, 1st of February in Fermoy, Co. Cork.

The salmon, which weighed 7lbs, was confirmed as the first salmon caught in 2017 by Inland Fisheries Ireland today. The fish was caught while the river was high with around two foot visibility at 4pm on Wednesday. O’Connor’s success followed a morning of stormy weather which cleared slightly before he managed to catch the elusive salmon.  

Ciaran Byrne, CEO of Inland Fisheries Ireland said: “The 2017 fishing season has commenced in earnest now and we are delighted that the first salmon of the New Year has been caught. Ireland is known as an angling destination across Europe as a result of its indigenous wild fish populations and impressive scenery. With over 273,600 domestic anglers in Ireland, Ronan O’Connor did extremely well to secure the title for catching the first fish of 2017.

We look forward to growing angling participation in Ireland even more this year. Our fisheries resource is hugely valuable and offers rural communities sustainable tourism and job opportunities outside of the traditional tourist seasons. We will continue to work with these communities to develop our angling infrastructure and improve access with a view to increasing angling participation and growing local economic growth as a result.”

Anglers looking for fishing information in Ireland in 2017 can visit www.fishinginireland.info for the latest news and fishing reports. For those looking to try out fishing for the first time, Inland Fisheries Ireland will run a number of Education and Outreach initiatives throughout the year with all information posted on www.fisheriesireland.ie.

Inland Fisheries Ireland is also inviting the public to help protect and conserve the fisheries resource during the year by reporting incidents to its confidential hotline number telephone1890 34 74 24 or 1890 FISH 24. The phone line is designed to encourage the reporting of incidents of illegal fishing, water pollution and invasive species.

ENDS

For further information:
Órla Sheils
Communications Manager
Tel: (01) 8842673
E: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Note to Editors:

About Inland Fisheries Ireland

Inland Fisheries Ireland is a statutory body operating under the aegis of the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment (DCCAE) and was established under the Fisheries Act on 1st July 2010. Its principal function is the protection and conservation of the inland fisheries resource. Inland Fisheries Ireland promotes, supports, facilitates and advises the Minister on the conservation, protection, management, development and improvement of inland fisheries, including sea angling. Inland Fisheries Ireland also develops policy and national strategies relating to inland fisheries and sea angling and advises the Minister on same.



 

Inland Fisheries Ireland put 188,000 person hours into Fisheries Protection in 2016

Huge effort invested into safeguarding resource contributing €836m to Irish economy every year

Wednesday, 25th of January 2017: Inland Fisheries Ireland spent 188,404 person hours and carried out 31,180 patrols in 2016 to protect the fisheries resource, it was announced today at the launch of the Inland Fisheries Ireland Protection Review. The review highlights the results of recent protection work of the fisheries resource, which contributes €836 million to the Irish economy every year.

Inland Fisheries Ireland’s programme saw fisheries officers patrol the entire resource which includes 74,000 kilometres of rivers and streams, 128,000 hectares of lakes and 5,500 kilometres of coastline in their attempts to apprehend those responsible for illegal fishing and environmental offences.

Some key findings from the Fisheries Protection 2016 Review include:

  • 103 prosecution cases initiated for breaches of fisheries and environmental legislation, regarded as one of the most important tools in the prevention of illegal fishing activities in the long term.

  • 1,487 items of illegal fishing equipment seized, including 301 illegal fishing nets which measured 14,782 metres in total, approximately the same distance it takes to travel from Leinster House on Kildare Street to Dublin Airport.

  • 22,066 environmental inspections across a variety of sites including farms, industrial premises, wastewater plants, forestry sites, wind farms as well general inspections for pollutants in the natural habitat. Inspections were carried out by environmental officers with a view to mitigating against potential environmental incidents which could have a detrimental impact on fish populations and fish habitats.

  • 36,979 inspections of recreational anglers carried out nationwide to ensure anglers were compliant with the fisheries acts, which aim to protect fish populations.

Fisheries Inspectors Lorraine O'Donnell and Michael Hennessy with Dr Ciaran Byrne, CEO of Inland Fisheries Ireland and Minister Sean Kyne T.D
Fisheries Inspectors Lorraine O'Donnell and Michael Hennessy with Dr Ciaran Byrne, CEO of Inland Fisheries Ireland and Minister Sean Kyne T.D.

 

Sean Kyne TD, Minister with responsibility for Inland Fisheries, who today opened Inland Fisheries Ireland’s Oireachtas Briefing Day event said, ”close to 200,000 man hours speaks for itself but I want to commend Inland Fisheries Ireland for the immense and dedicated efforts they have put into protecting our invaluable inland fisheries resource. The vast array of river, lake and coastal based habitats present huge logistical challenges for our front line protection staff and for Inland Fisheries Ireland Management.  These challenges are being met by augmenting traditional patrol and protection methods with state-of-the-art surveillance technologies and new and innovative patrol methods in the ever changing environment in which services are delivered.”  

Dr Ciaran Byrne, CEO of Inland Fisheries Ireland said: “The role of Inland Fisheries Ireland is to act as steward of the inland fisheries resource and that role is crucial as we endeavour to protect and conserve Ireland’s aquatic habitat and the wild, indigenous fish populations who live within it. Our fisheries and environmental officers worked relentlessly in 2016 to ensure the continued availability of this resource to communities nationwide for recreational and business opportunities.

“The resource contributes €836 million to the Irish economy every year and in particular, it supports rural and peripheral communities through tourism opportunities which may not be there otherwise. Our National Strategy for Angling Development outlines how we can grow the economic contribution by an additional €96 million per year and our protection programme goes hand in hand in helping us realise those ambitions.”

The fisheries protection programme comprised planned day and night patrols, covert patrols and intelligence led surveillance operations and specifically targeted the fish species most at risk during particular seasons. The principle methods used for patrols were boats (1,151 patrols), kayaks (188 patrols) and personal water crafts (37 patrols) while land based patrols were carried out using quad bikes (84 patrols), bicycles (363 patrols) and by vehicles and foot (29,357 patrols). In addition to the use of traditional methods, fisheries officers used advanced surveillance equipment including night vision scopes, thermal imaging scopes and enhanced optical surveillance scopes to help them in their work.

Inland Fisheries Ireland’s National Strategy for Angling Development is the first national framework for the development of Ireland’s angling resource. The strategy will deliver a wide-ranging set of investments, innovations and promotions to ensure that fish stocks and angling infrastructure are protected and enhanced and will see an investment of €25 million over the next five years to grow the socio-economic contribution of angling in Ireland.

Last year, over €1 million was invested by Inland Fisheries Ireland in angling development projects alone which included 50 angling access development projects as part of the Capital Grants Fund plus ongoing investment in more than 4,000 angling structures.

For more information on Inland Fisheries Ireland and to view the Fisheries Protection Review, visit www.fisheriesireland.ie .

ENDS

For media information:

Órla Sheils
Communications Manager
Inland Fisheries Ireland
E: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
T: 01 8842673

Note to Editors:

Inland Fisheries Ireland is a statutory body operating under the aegis of the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment (DCCAE) and was established under the Fisheries Act on 1st July 2010. Its principal function is the protection and conservation of the inland fisheries resource. Inland Fisheries Ireland promotes, supports, facilitates and advises the Minister on the conservation, protection, management, development and improvement of inland fisheries, including sea angling. Inland Fisheries Ireland also develops policy and national strategies relating to inland fisheries and sea angling and advises the Minister on same.